First Generation

1. William Stirling1 was born in 1637 in Hertford, Hertfordshire, England. He died on 22 Jan 1719 at the age of 82 in Sterling City, Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States. He was buried in Sterling Cem, Sterling City, Connecticut, United States.2 William was a mariner, ship carpenter.2

WILLIAM STERLING
The following is an excerpt from “Supplement to the Hess Family in Ameica 1984” by Barbara Allison. Barbara has researched these families for many years.

38. William 6 Sterling[1] (David, #76) was born circa 1632 at London, England.[2] He first married Elizabeth Sawtelle, circa 1659.[3] Elizabeth died 6 February 1675, in Haverhill, Massachusetts.[4] After the death of Elizabeth he then married Mary Blaisdell (see #39), the daughter of Ralph Blaisdell and Elizabeth Parker, on 19 December 1676 in Haverhill, Essex Co., Massachusetts.[5], [6], [7] After the death of Elizabeth he married Ann (Nichols) Neale, (the widow of John Neals), 24 April 1683, in Haverhill, Massachusetts.[8], [9] William died on 22 January 1719 at Connecticut.

The first mention that has been found of William in New England is in the Essex County Records at Salem, Massachusetts, where the names of five children are given as born at Rowley Village at Mirrimack. The village refered to as what is now Bradford, on the opposite side of the Merrimac River from Haverhill, where William lived many years.[10] Good Starling[11] was taxed three shillings and ten pence, in Rowley, between the years 1660 and 1664.[12]

William is called Mariner in the early records. He was also a ship carpenter and a miller.[13] He bought land of Stephen Kent of Haverhill in 1662 and settled north of the land belonging to the orphan Wilson children, near the Rowley line. In this year of 1662, there was deeded to John Remington of Roxbury, Carpenter, from William Sterling of Rowley, 80 Acres of Rowley land, south of Mirimack River and on its bank.

William then settled on a ridge east of Haverhill, on the Merrimac River and near a small stream called Little River, which passes under what is now Washington Square. Here he probably had a house and a mill. There was also a spring on his ground which supplied his family and his neighbors with water.

A ferry across the Merrimac River, established in 1647, was operated from this land of William’s. The same old ferry, one of the oldest in the country, still plies its small boats and does a brisk business in spite of the cars which cross the bridge.

In the early spring of 1669, William sold his Rowley property to Stephen Kent, with a provision the “Road to ye Ferry be open for euer.”[14] This has so far been observed.

At the same time, Kent sold to William Sterling for 104, a house, barn, and orchard near the homes of Kent and Remington. At this sale, Hilliard and Henry West were witnesses; both Salem seamen and traders. Possibly William built ships at Haverhill for the coast trade, as he afterward did at Lyme, as Haverhill is at the head of tidewater and sloop navigation.

Sometime before the year 1683 the town conveyed to William Sterling a lot of about twelve acres. On this ground he erected a house, which stood for many years as an inn. The city hall of Haverhill now stands on its site. This house where William lived for some years was a two-story structure with a door in the center of the front facade and a hallway running through, a typical colonial residence of the period.[15]

The town conveyed to William Sterling, a ship carpenter, this lot of about twelve acres before 1683. He sold to Francis Wainwright eleven acres of it (that part above the house), April 24, 1683, and it soon after came into the hands of Capt. John Wainwright. Mr. Sterling conveyed the rest of the lot and the house to Capt. Wainwright and removed to Lyme, Conn.

Cornet James Pecker of Haverhill was an inn holder and had kept a public house in town for several years. He bought this estate of Capt. Wainwright, 16 May 1717. Mr. Pecker apparently erected a brick dwelling house just south of the old house soon after his purchase and removed to it. Some years later he turned over to his son John the business of a public house and resumed his original occupation of farming. He conveyed this estate, with the houses and barns, to John, 14 February 1729-30.

John Pecker conveyed the old house and a small lot to Grant Webster of Haverhill, a trader, 26 March 1748, and just four years later Mr. Webster sold them to Benjamin Harrold of Boston, brazier.

Mr. Harrod died about 1781 and his son Joseph came into possession of the property and for many years conducted there in the inn known as the “Mason’s Arms,” its sign board consisting of a painting representing the Freemasons’ arms. Here Washington stayed on his visit east in 1789. Mr. Harrod died and his heirs conveyed the premises to Phineas Foster, a merchant of Boston, 13 January 1830. Mr. Foster died soon after and 31 December 1836, his heirs sold them to James H. Duncan.

Mr. Duncan conveyed the house and middle of the lot to the town 8 May 1847. The house was then demolished and the townhouse built upon the site the same year.

John Pecker lived in the brick house and died possessed of it in 1757. A part was assigned to the widow as dower and the rest was occupied by Matthew Soley as a tavern in 1763. This house was situated on Main Street, about a hundred feet southeast of the city hall. Subsequently passing through many vicissitudes of conveyances, inheritances, mortgages and sheriffs’ levies, the title finally came into the hands of John White just before the great fire of Sunday, April 16, 1775, in which the house was destroyed.

After the death of Mary, William then married 3d, in Haverhill, 24 April 1683, Mrs. Ann (Nichols) Neale of Salem, widow of John Neale, whom she m. in 1672. He was baptized 24 January 1657/58, and died 11 November 1679. By this marriage Ann was the mother of: John, born 15 April 1673, died before 1700, married Martha Skerry; Thomas, born 14 February 1675; Joseph, born 4 December 1677; Rebecca, born 23 February 1679. (Driver Gene., p. 444.)

John Neale was the son of John and Mary (Lawes) Neale. The “inventory of his estate was taken Nov. 24, 1679; it ammounted to 221, 00s 10d returned by Ann, the relict and administratrix; mentions son John to have 40; Thomas to have 20; Joseph 20 and dafter Rebecka, 20.”

“A Petition of Ann Neale mentions that there is land to be given to her husband at the decease of his mother (who is now living) by his father’s will and also land given to him by his grandfather in his will four years after the decease of my husband’s mother, the value of both peaces of Land is 145 .”[16]

William Starling and Ann Neale made the following marriage contract:

“Whereas, there is an intended marriage between William Sterling of Haverhill, and Ann Neale, widow, of Salem, and in order to the consummation thereof; in order to the settling of things between them, relating to their outward estate:”

“1st. They have mutually agreed as followeth: that what estate in house and land the said Ann is possessed of for her use and her children, as administratrix to estate of her former husband, John Neale, shall be and remain to her and her children and assignees and that said William Sterling shall have noe right, title or interest therein; only the rent and improvement of ye said houses and land to be to the use of said William and Ann, after their marriage and soe long as they shall live togeather as man and wife.”

“2nd. That for what household goods and moveables the said Ann shall bring with her on marriage, shall be to their use and mutuall comfort togeather, while they both survive togeather; and if the said William decease before ye said Ann, and leave her a widdow, that then the said Moveables return to ye said Ann: but if please God to give them a child or children, that shall then be surviving, at her decease, shall be and remain to those children to be and belong to her and her children by her first husband, what shall be remaining of ye said estate.”

“3d. It is mutually agreed by and between them, that if it shall please God that he, ye said William, depart this life and leave ye said Ann a widdow, that she shall have and hold and injoy to her use, the third part of all ye estate of ye said William, in house and lands according as the law directs, soe long as ye said Ann shall live a widdow; but in case of her marriage with another man then that third is to return to ye heires of ye said William.

4th. It is alsoe agreed mutually, that in case ye said Ann should depart this life before ye said William, and shall leave a child or children, by ye said William, that what moveables as above brought by her shall be and remain to her children; but in case she shall have no child by ye said William, that shall then be surviving, then what of those goods or estates, that shall be then remaining to be to the use & delivered up into ye possession of her children by her former husband:” “memorandum, — it is to be understood, that when any of ye said Ann, her children by her former husband, shall come to age and demand their interest in ye land and housing aforesaid, that they are to have it delivered to them; and so the proportion of rent or improvement thereof no longer to be expected by ye said William.”

“5th. And, lastly, it is mutually agreed upon by and between ye parties above said, that whatever debts or legacies are due from the estate to any person or persons, whatsoever, or whatever is owing to the estate from any person, the said William Sterling is not to be at all concerned with, or liable to make any payments in that kind out of his own estate.

And it is further agreed, upon ye consumation of marriage as aforesaid, that ye said Ann may bring with her, her two youngest children, whom ye said William is free to take with her, his said wife, and maintain upon his own cost and charge, upon and in consideration of, in and by these articles before expressed.”

“In witness whereof ye parties aforesaid, William Sterling and Ann Neale have sett to their hands, this two and twentieth day of March, Anno Domini 1682-3

WILLIAM STERLING
ANN NEALE
In the presence of
Hilliard Veren. John Norman. Jeremiah Neale.”
(Salem Town Records.)

William Sterling married his fourth wife in Lyme. With her he made the following agreement:

“Where as there is A contract of marriage intended between Mr. William Sterling of Lyme in ye Colony of Connecticut and ye weidow Mary Sayer of ye same town, it is mutually agreed between them, first is that all of ye estate, both Reall and personall: which ye sd weidow Mary Sayer is now owner of shall be and remain in her sole possion and be desposed at her pleasure, as she shall see meet after ye consumation of marriage with ye sd Sterling, notwithstanding any custom or law to ye contery, and that all dispossals by her made shall stand vallid and good.”

“2nd. Ye sd Sterling doth hereby ingage to his sd wife that duering her life she shall injoy all his estate, both lands and chattels and if it pless god to grant him a child or children by her the sd child or children shall injoy ye sd estate for them and their heirs for ever; In testimony whereof they have her unto set their hands January ye fifth — 170 5/6.

WILLIAM STERLING [Seal]
Signed sealed and MARY SAYER [Seal]
delivered in ye presence of us
Moses Noyes, Senior
Moses Noyes, Junior
John Noyes.” (Lyme Town Records.)

Mrs. Mary Sayer or Sawyer was b. Nov. 17, 1674, dau. of Hugh Hubbard of New London (about 1670), said to be from Derbyshire, England, who m. in 1673, Jane, dau. of Cary Latham. Mary married 1st, Ichabod Sayer of New London, in 1697. (Savage’s Gene. Dict.) She gave the following release of her husband’s estate:

“Where as by the covenant within written Mrs. Mary is during her life to enjoy all ye estate both land and chattels of her husband Mr. William Sterling, it is agreed and consented to by ye sd Mary Sterling that if ye sum of fourteen pounds in money be paid to her after her husbands deceas by his excutors togeather with the house hold goods after specified besides what was her own before, Viz The set of curtains, three pair of sheets, a meal log, a meet Tub, an iron pot, a quart puter pot, and a cupple of poeringers and the lumber about ye houss as all so a cow with her increose which given to her when it was a calfe, that she will except it as full satisfaction and quit her clame to the rest of her husbands estate both lands and chattels in testimony wherof she hos set to her hand and seal January ye 7 17 15/17.

MARY SAYER [Seal]
Signed and sealed
Witness
Moses Noyes.
Moses Noyes, Jur.”
(Lyme Town Records.)

This release was given a couple of months after William and Mary Sterling made a deed of their property to William’s son Daniel, probably in order to facilitate the settlement of the estate.

Two years after William’s death, Mary gave the following receipt:

“Where as there was a writing made to Me, Mary Sterling of Lyme, that after ye Decease of my honored husband, Mr. William Sterling, I should be paid the sume of fifteen pounds in money and some other consideration, I ye sd Mary Sterling, do here by acknowledge that I have received full satisfaction for all that was due me, or that I might demand on my own account, what so ever, from ye estate of my sd Husband deceased, or from Mr. Daniel Sterling, and I do hereby ocquit and discharge Mr. Daniel Sterling and his heirs from all dues and demands whatsoever, and the estate of my sd husband, as witness my hand and seal in Lyme, Feb. ye 8th 17 20/21

MARY STERLING” [Seal]
(Lyme Town Records.)

Mrs. Mary Starling witnessed a deed of sale, 24 April 1706, and on 7 September 1714, deeded to her “beloued son Moses Sawyer,” the portion of his father’s estate due him. (Ibid.)

Haverhill, where William Sterling lived for twenty-eight years, from 1669 to 1697, was first settled by twelve men from Ipswich and Newbury in 1640.

Peace and prosperity reigned in the settlement until 1675, at which time it had grown to rank twenty-fifth among the fortynine towns in the Colony. King Philip’s War, the most general and destructive ever sustained by the infant colonies, broke out in 1675. A meeting was held in Haverhill, Feb. 19, of this year, to take steps for protection against the Indians and to complete the fortifications around the meeting-house, begun several years before. The meeting-house was built in 1648, and was the only place of worship of the settlers until 1699, when a new one was constructed. This church stood to one side of the central portion of what is now Pentucket cemetery. Back of it was laid out in 1660 a burial ground which is now a part of the Linwood and Pentucket cemeteries. Here undoubtedly were laid to rest William’s first and second wives and those of his children who died in Haverhill.

——————————————————————————–

[1] . Albert Mack Sterling. The Sterling Genealogy, Crafton Press (1909) New York, Vol. I, pp. 241-249.
[2]. The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. VIII, p. 53.
[3] . Clarence Almon Torrey. New England Marriages Prior To 1700, p. 706.
[4]. David W. Hoyt. The Old Families Of Salisbury And Amesbury, Massachusetts, p. 322.
[5] . Clarence Almon Torrey. New England Marriages Prior To 1700, p. 706.
[6]. Walter Goodwin Davis. Nicholas Davis Ancestry, pp. 59-66.
[7]. Robert Charles Anderson, George F. Sanborn Jr., Meline Lutz Sanborn. The Great Migration – Immigrants To New Engand 1634-1635, Vol. I, )A-B), p. 321.
[8]. James Savage. A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England – Showing Three Generation Of Those Who Came Before May 1692, Vol. IV, p. 173.
[9]. Clarence Almon Torrey. New England Marriages Prior To 1700, p. 706.
[10]. Comments: Bradford was settled in 1649; the name was changed to Mirrimack in January 1672, to Bradford (J.D. Kingsbury, ’83. Memorial History of Bradford). Another Rowley Village on the Merrimac was what is now called Boxford, which was settled in 1645. Its name was changed in 1686. (Sidney Perley ‘80, History of Boxford).
[11]. Comment: “Good” is a contraction of the obsolete term “goodman,” a term inferior to that of “Mister.”
[12]. N.E. History Genealogy Register Vol. XV, p. 254.
[13]. Albert Mack Sterling. The Sterling Genealogy, Vol. I, p. 242.
[14]. Salem, Massachusetts Records, Vol. 2, p. 169.
[15]. The history of this building is given in the Essex Antiquarian, Vol. III, pp. 167-168.
[16]. Essex Inst. Hist. Collection, Vol. III, p. 63.
[17] . David W. Hoyt. The Old Families Of Salisbury And Amesbury, Massachusetts, p. 322.
[18]. Clarence Almon Torrey. New England Marriages Prior To 1700, p. 258.
[19] . Clarence Almon Torrey. New England Marriages Prior To 1700, p. 706.
[20] . David W. Hoyt. The Old Families Of Salisbury And Amesbury, Massachusetts, p. 322.
[21]. David W. Hoyt. The Old Families Of Salisbury And Amesbury, Massachusetts, p. 322

He married 3) Ann Neale (widow) of Salem, MA.

William Stirling and Elizabeth Sawtell were married in 1659 in Haverhill Essex County, Massachusetts, United States. Elizabeth Sawtell, daughter of Richard Sawtell and Elizabeth Poples, was born on 1 May 1638 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. She died on 6 Feb 1675 at the age of 36 in Haverhill Essex County, Massachusetts, United States. She died on 6 Feb 1675 at the age of 36.2 Elizabeth died on 6 Feb 1674/5 at the age of 36 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts, United States.

Re: Richard SAWTELL b. 7 Apr. 1611 Posted by: Debbie Lukich Date: January 05, 2000 at 09:47:17 In Reply to: Re: Richard SAWTELL b. 7 Apr. 1611 by patti loeffler 6 of 26 Here is what I have: Richard Sawtell b. abt. 1608 Aller Somerset,England; christened April 7, 1611 Aller, Somerset, England; m. Feb. 5, 1628 High Ham,Somerset, England to Elizabeth Pople(or Pope)b. abt. 1611 High Ham, Somerset, England; d. Oct.18, 1694 Watertown, MA. Richard died August 21, 1694 in Watertown, MA. They had 11children all of whom I have names, some birthdates,marriages, deaths, etc. Richardsparents were John Sawtell & Agnes Pittard. John b. 1570-1575 Aller, Somerset, Englandd. Dec. 20, 1622 buried same date both in Aller, Somerset, England. He married AgnesPittard on Oct. 9, 1599 Aller, Somerset, England. Agnes was b. Jan, 1579 Kingsbury, Episcopal,England; christened Jan. 1579 same place; d. & buried Dec. 21, 1622 Aller, Somerset, England.They had 9 children, again I have names, some birthdates, a couple marriages &deaths. John’s parents were John Alias Dolm Sawtell & Agnes ?. John Alias Dolman Sawtell b.between 1525&1535 in Drayton, Somersetshire, England; d. May 20, 1591 Aller, Somersetshire,England. He married abt. 1560 to Agnes ? b. abt. 1535 Somersetshire, England d. after 1591Aller, Somersetshire, England. They had 4 children, John (my line, mentioned above); Joan b.abt. 1560 m. Robert MAsters Oct. 31, 1584; Lucy b. abt. 1562; and William b. 1565 m. AliceBennett Jan. 31, 1593. All these 4 kids were born in Aller, Somerset, England. My sources for all this are: LDS Ancesterial File; Kindred Konnections; Family Treemaker and “AnElwell Genealogy” by Marjorie Elwell Shadduck. Hope this helps.

Richard SAWTELL58 ../at_src/src002.html>, 7G Grandfather. at01_021.html> at01_021.html> was baptized on 7 Apr 1611 in Aller, Somersetshire, England. Died on 21 Aug 1694. Will dated on 16 May 1692. Immigrated by 1636.

A comprehensive treatment of Richard Sawtell and his descendants was published by Kellogg and Threlfall in the Register in 197228 ../at_src/src001.html>. At that time no information was available on Richard’s ancestry, but that want has since been supplied by Threlfall in his GMC5058 ../at_src/src002.html>, which revises some of the information about Richard himself that had been included in the earlier Register paper. The information here about Richard and his ancestors follows GMC50, with the information on Richard’s descendants being taken from Kellogg and Threlfall.

According to GMC50: “RICHARD SAWTELL (John, John) was baptised 7 April 1611 at Aller, Somersetshire, the son of John and Agnes (Pittard) Sawtell.

“Richard Sawtell of Watertown, Massachusetts first appears in New England records 25 July 1636 as a proprietor of Watertown when he received a grant of 25 acres, it being Lot 8, the 4th division. He was apparently unmarried when he emigrated, for in February 1636/7, he was granted a one acre homestead lot, the allocation being at the rate of one acre per person in each family. He had a brother, Thomas, also in New England. Thomas was admitted freeman in 1649 and died in Boston in 1651, childless and apparently unmarried. In his will of 14 May 1651, proved 18 September, he referred to his brother Richard and a brother and sister Kenrick of Muddy River (Suffolk County Probate #111). This would presumably be John and Ann Kendrick. Ann died 15 November 1656.

“Richard Sawtell lived for about 25 years at Watertown and there all his children were born. Then, about 1662, he and his family all moved to the new plantation of Groton, where he was a proprietor with a 20 acre right and was chosen the first town clerk there for 1662-4.

“On April 4, 1671, he petitioned the Middlesex Court to be excused from further military training. Since military service was required of all able bodied men to the age of 60, he presumably had reached that age. This fits in perfectly with the baptismal date for Richard Sawtell of Aller.

“King Philip’s War broke out in 1675 and on 13 March 1675/6, Groton was attacked and burned. His house was one of the five garrison houses of the town (History of Middlesex County). The inhabitants deemed it necessary to abandon the town at this time and he returned to Watertown and remained there the rest of his life, as did several of his children. On 4 November 1689, he was chosen a selectman of Watertown.

“His wife, named Elizabeth, was probably a daughter of one of the early Watertown settlers, but which one is unknown. Richard Kimball had a daughter, Elizabeth, of marriageable age and was living in Watertown at the time. [p. 344] She was still living when her father died, but who she married is unknown. However, there were at least two other Watertown men who married Elizabeths about that time, but there is no clue as to which of these was Elizabeth Kimball, if any.

“In 1670 or 71, Richard Sawtell and his wife took into their home the illegitimate child of Zechariah Smith, deceased. In 1672, he went to court against Thomas, John and Joseph Smith to collect for the child’s keep out of the estate of the boy’s father, and charged them with illegally administering the estate. He won £10.

“On 16 May 1692, Richard Sawtell wrote his own will. In this will he provided for his wife Elizabeth, mentioned son Obadiah of Groton, son Enoch of Watertown, daughters Bethia, Hannah Winn, Ruth Hewes, son John, son Jonathan, deceased, son Zechariah’s children, and daughter Starling’s children. His lands were at Watertown except for his 20 acre right in Groton. He died 21 August 1694, ‘an aged man’. Elizabeth died 18 October 1694 and son Enoch was granted administration of the estate. His signature on his will is reproduced below. [A facsimile of the signature appears here.]

“A Henry Sawtell was a patentee of Flushing, New York in 1665 and was a freeholder of Newton, Long Island, New York, 4 December 1666. Any relationship to Richard of Watertown is unknown.”

Accounts of Richard’s children and a complete transcript of his will follow.

Richard Sawtell and his wife Elizabeth are ancestors of U.S. Presidents Herbert Hoover (probably, through daughter Hannah) and Richard Nixon (through son Zachariah).65 ../at_src/src002.html>

He married Elizabeth POPLE46 ../at_src/src001.html>, 7G Grandmother.

They had the following children:
i. Elizabeth58 ../at_src/src002.html> (1638-1692)
ii. Jonathan58 ../at_src/src002.html> (1639-1690)
iii. Mary58 ../at_src/src002.html> (1640-1665)
iv. Hannah58 ../at_src/src002.html> (1642-1723)
v. Zachariah58 ../at_src/src002.html> (1644-)
vi. Bethia58 ../at_src/src002.html> (~1647-1714)
408 vii. Obadiah at01_010.html> (~1649-1741)
viii. Ruth58 ../at_src/src002.html> (~1651-1721)
ix. Richard58 ../at_src/src002.html> (-1676)
x. John58 ../at_src/src002.html>
xi. Enoch58 ../at_src/src002.html> (-1742)

William Stirling and Elizabeth Sawtell had the following child:

2 i. Richard Stirling, born 5 Aug 1663, Rowley Essex, Massachusetts, United States; married Grace Ireland, bef 1686.

Second Generation

2. Richard Stirling (William-1) was born on 5 Aug 1663 in Rowley Essex, Massachusetts, United States. He was born on 5 Aug 1663 in Rawley Village, Massachusetts, United States.2–3 He has reference number 13 000 035.2

Richard Stirling and Grace Ireland were married before 1686.2 Grace Ireland, daughter of John Ireland and Grace Healy, has reference number 13 000 035.2

Richard Stirling and Grace Ireland had the following child:

3 i. William Stirling, born 5 Sep 1695, Bristol, Bristol County, Rhode Island, United States; married Abigail Patchen, 1714, Fairfield, Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States; died Fairfield, Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States.

Third Generation

3. William Stirling (Richard-2, William-1) was born on 5 Sep 1695 in Bristol, Bristol County, Rhode Island, United States.2 He died in Fairfield, Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States.2 He has reference number 12 000 034.2 Notes for William Sterling, 5 Sep 1695 – 1771

From “History and Genealogy of the Patchin-Patchen Family”, Grace Patchen Leggett, 1952:

“This Assembly do establish William Sterling to be Ensign of the 6th company or trainband in the third regiment in this State.” May, 1779, Records of the State of Connecticut, v. 2:301.

William Sterling bought of his brother-in-law, Jacob Patchen, 15 acres of land in Norwalk, Conn., Wilton Parish, at a place called “Primpewang”, north of “Harris Ridge” on the highway and adjoining common land.

William Stirling and Abigail Patchen were married in 1714 in Fairfield, Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States.2 Abigail Patchen, daughter of Jacob Patchen and Mary Hubbard, was born on 24 Mar 1694/5. She was baptized on 24 Mar 1695.2 She died after 1773 at the age of 78. Abigail has reference number 12 000 034.2

Fairfield Vital Records from Barbour, 1639-1850 – P – S
Transcribed by Coralynn Brown

PATCHEN, PATCHIN

+ Abigail, m William STERLING, ______, 1714

William Stirling and Abigail Patchen had the following child:

4 i. William Stirling, born 10 Oct 1716, Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States; married Mrs Wiliam ; died 4 Jun 1754, Wilton, British America.

Fourth Generation

4. William Stirling (William-3, Richard-2, William-1) was born on 10 Oct 1716 in Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States.2 He died on 4 Jun 1754 at the age of 37 in Wilton, British America.2 He has reference number 11 000 035.2 William has reference number W5WV-RL.

William Stirling and Mrs Wiliam were married. Mrs Wiliam was born (date unknown).

William Stirling and Wiliam had the following child:

5 i. Corporal James Stirling ARW, born abt 1746; married Hannah May, 28 Jun 1767, Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut By Thormas Russell, United States; died 13 Jul 1829, Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States.

Fifth Generation

5. Corporal James Stirling ARW4–5 (William-4, William-3, Richard-2, William-1) was born about 1746. He immigrated about 1750 to Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States. He served in the military on 27 Aug 1776 in Battle of Long Island, New York, United States.6 DAR Patriot_ID=695426 James served in the military on 27 Aug 1776 in Battle of Long Island, New York, United States. He appeared in the census in 1790 in Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States.7 He died on 13 Jul 1829 at the age of 83 in Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States.8 James had his estate probated on 25 Mar 1831 in Litchfield, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States.9–10 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE:DAR lineage]

James Stirling was born about 1747. In Asa Bonney’s Account books, this James was listed as James Sterling, Jr. [Note: This is most probably a reference to his son James – Rick] He owned James Sterling Farm between 1767 and 1829 in Goshen, Litchfield, Connecticut.

In Edward Star’s History of Cornwall, Page 252 – Road to Goshen past James Sterling’s and Sam Hillhouse’s through College Farms to meet a road in Goshen. Pg. 243 – 1803 – Also road approved through Thomas Sterling’s land.

This pretty much pinpoints where James Sterling farm was: In Goshen 9/10 of a mile before the Cornwall line, a road runs west toward Mohawk Mt. and this road is Allyn Rd. As it approaches the Mountain and goes over the Cornwall line this becomes Mohawk Mountain Road. It was in this area as far as I can determine, the College Farms was located — That was land set aside by the state for Yale College when the lands were parceled off.

(Source Letter From Dorothy Russ – 15 Sep 1997, West Cornwall, CT 06796-1610) He was a Gatherer of Firewood on 20 Dec 1769 in Cornwall, Litchfield , Connecticut.

In Cornwall Town Meeting Minutes the following is recorded – “That James Sterling shall have 39s/6 lawful money for getting 10 cords of good firewood for Mr. Gold, provided he delivers the same to Mr. Gold at or before the first day of Oct. next. He was a Gather Firewood on 12 Dec 1774 in Cornwall, Litchfield , Connecticut.

In Cornwall Town Meeting Minutes the following is recorded -“That James Sterling shall have 3 5/s for getting 10 cords of good fire wood for Mr. Gold” He served in the military on 27 Au g 1776 in Battle of Long Island, New York. (189)(190) He served in the military after 27 Au g 1776 in Connecticut.

James returned a gun to the State of Connecticut, replacing the one he had lost in the battle of New York. He was a Committee Member – Surveyor of Highways on 21 Dec 1779 in Cornwall , L itchfield , Connecticut.

In Cornwall Town Meeting Minutes the following is recorded – “Voted that Thomas Hart, Sam Lindsley, Rufus Payne, Samuel Scovel, James Wadsworth, Maj. John Sedgwick, John Jones, John Wright, William Stewart, James Sterling and Josiah Patterson be Surveyors of Highways for the year ensuing” He was a Committee Member – Schools on 4 Dec 1780 in Cornwall, Litchfield , Connecticut.

“Voted that Messrs. Sam Scovel, Levi Bonney, Benoni Pack, Daniel Stewart, Daniel Abbott, Nehemiah Beardselee, Matthew Beach, Daniel Harrison Jr., Jacob Brownson Jr., and James Sterling be Committees of Schools for the year ensuing.” He was a Committee Member – Schools on 2 Dec 1 782 in Cornwall, Litchfield , Connecticut.

“Voted that Nathan Seward, Joseph Carcee, Solomon Emmons, Jesse Buell, Seth Pierce, Samuel Lindley, Samuel Wadsworth, James Sterling, Titus Bonney, Andre Youn and Zechariah H. Jones be Committees of the Schools for the year ensuing.” He appeared on the census in 1790 in Cornwall , Litchfield , Connecticut.

In the 1790 Census James Stirling (Sterling) was listed as “James Stirlin”, had three free white males of 16 years an upward including heads of families, 3 free white males under 16 years, and 6 free white females including heads of families.

Edward Comfort Starr corrected many of the misspellings on the census (the census taker’s spelling was horrible) and generated a document 18 Apr 1922 to correct many of the spellings . He appeared on the census in 1800 in Cornwall, Litchfield , Connecticut.

Page 5, line 4 – James “Stirling” enumerated the following 1 male under age 10, 1 male age 1 6 -26, and 1 male age 45 and over. Females were 2 age 10-16, 2 age 16-26, and one female ag e 4 5 and over. Entry in Cornwall Town Meeting Notes on 7 Jul 1800 in Cornwall, Litchfield , Connecticut.

“Voted that the Selectmen and Proprietors Committee be requested and impowered to lay out or exchange the road or highway from Cornwall to Goshen by James Stirling’s and Samuel Hillhouse’s dwelling houses in the most convenient place to meet a road or highway to be laid out by the Town of Goshen through the College Farms to the line between said towns. (Description in booknotes describes Goshen’s College Farms as being on the border with Cornwall where Allyn Rd. enters Cornwall at Mohawk Mountain Road.) He was Entry in Cornwall Town Meeting Notes on 20 Apr 1801 in Cornwall, Litchfield , Connecticut.

“… and a highway leading from Cornwall to Goshen by Judah Kellogg’s dwelling house through Lemuel Jenning’s and James Stirling’s lands want making reapirs, it is voted that a rate or tax of one cent on a dollar on the list and polls and ratable estate of the inhabitants of the Town of Cornwall for the year 1800 be levied and collected on or before the 20th day of May next for the purpose of making, amending and repairing. Said tax to be paid in money or labor on said roads, those who pay in labor to have 50 cents by the day and to labor 8 hours for a day’s work.” He was a Committe Member – Surveyor of Highways on 16 Nov 1801 in Cornwall, Litchfield , Connecticut.

“Items that Rufus Swift, Matthew Patterson, Titus Bonney, Zechariah H. Jones, Daniel Allen ( Related to Ethan Allen), General Heman Swift, Andrew Cotter, John Calhoon, John Farnum, Roger Catline, Timothy Johnson, Sam Wadsworth, Oliver Hochkin, Sam Ward, Joel Harrison Jr., Joseph Barce and James Stirling be Surveyors of Highways for the ensuing year.”

NOTE: This is the last mention of James Stirling on a commitee in the Cornwall town meeting notes. James served with many interesting people over the years, namely General Herman Swift, Major John Sedgwick, and Daniel Allen, who was related to Ethan Allen. He appeared on the census in 1810 in Cornwall, Litchfield , Connecticut. Enumeration was 1 male 16-26 years, 1 male over age 45, 2 females under ten years of age , 2 females age 16-26, and one female age 45 and over. James surname was listed as “Stirling ” on this census. He appeared on the census in 1820 in Cornwall, Litchfield , Connecticut.

James “Stirling” (he was listed as James Stirling on the 1800, and 1810 census) had the following free white males at home 1- age 16-26, 1 age 26-45, 1 – age 45 and over. Free white females 1- age 10-16, 1- age 26-45, 1- age 45 and over. In addition three were enumerated in ” Agriculture”. He died on 13 Jul 1829 in Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut. He had an estate probated on 25 Mar 1831 in Litchfield, Litchfield, Connecticut. He has Ancestral File number 1J85 -3M3.

James Stirling married in Cornwall, Conn., June 28, 1767, Hannah May, dau. of Edward May of Cornwall. James Stirling, although a Quaker, enlisted at Cornwall in Jun 1776 , as a member of Capt. Roger’s company, in the 2d Battalion, Wadsworth’s Brigade, raised under an act of the Legislature to reinforce Washington at New York City.

The battalion served on the Brooklyn front a few days before and during the Battle of Long Island, Aug. 27, 1776 and was in the retreat from New York, Aug. 29 and 30. It was stationed at New York under General Putnam and narrowly escaped capture and they retreated from the city , Sept. 15. They were posted on Harlem (Washington) heights until the Battle of White Plains, Oct. 28, 1776, in which the battalion was engaged and suffered some loss. James was mustered out with the company, Dec 25, 1776, and returned to his home.

It has also been reported that James may have served his country in the battle of Trenton.

When asked if he ever killed a man in battle he said he didn’t know, but that once he was surrounded by the enemy and in the fight he saw one man fall at a shot from his musket. Jumping over the body he escaped death or capture. “At the battle of Long Island, seeing his company was being surrounded, he rushed at the British line with clubbed musket and broke through , then threw away his gun and run, escaping unhurt.” (Judge Harrison, who had it from James ‘ s daughter.) James may have enlisted again as their is a tradition that he was in the Battle of Trenton. His early home in Cornwall was in a log house. This he built, together with farm buildings, on land which was afterwards proven to belong to another who had a prior claim . The town authorities, in a desire to assist him, laid out a highway through the disputed property and thus saved the barn from confiscation. But he had to build another dwelling.

James was a very vigorous man, large physically, a great worker, and could mow with scythe as much grass as two ordinary men could cut in the same time. He sometimes received the wages of two men for a days work.

Like most people of large stature, he was of a kindly and even tempered disposition and enjoyed a joke. In reply to some remarks by his more excitable wife he would say, “Don’t thee bite, Hannh.” His half sister, name not known, lived in his family and she did not seem to share his jovial disposition. He made some remark about her mouth which she resented so much that for a long time she would not eat at the table with him. So James ate his meals alone and left the table, that his sister might eat with the family.

He had one old horse which he had ridden for many years. Sometimes in returning from a short journey with the mare, he would come home, carrying the saddle on his arm, and leading the animal by its halter strap.

He was a consistent member of the Society of Friends and used their quaint forms of speech.

In 1776 “James Stirling worked the Rev. Hezekiah Gold’s farm in Cornwall and was assaulted by him, for which Mr. Gold was fined.” (Sedgwick’s pamphlet upon the history of Cornwall.) Asa Bonney, father of Meliscent, who married James son Isaac, kept an account book wherein are many items relative to James and his sons. The first mention, headed, “James Starling Jr . ” is dated May 30, 1780, and the last is Sept. 12, 1812

Hannah May Sterling was a member of the Cornwall First Church as early as 1775. Seven children by her were bapt. there, Ann, Daniel, Isaac and Thomas in 1775, a dau. in 1776, Rachel in 1778 , and James in 1781. A child died in 1789. James Sterling died in Cornwall July 13 , 1829. Hannah died there May 20, 1834.

Cornwall was first settled in 1739-40. None of the name of Sterling were there among the earliest settlers of the first eight years. (History of Litchfield Co., Conn., 1881, page, 290. )

James Sterling d. in Cornwall, July 13, 1829. Hannah (May) Sterling d. there May 20, 1834.

Enlisted at Cornwall in Jun 1776, as a member of Capt. Roger’s company, in the 2d Battalion , Wadsworth’s Brigade, raised under an act of the Legislature to reinforce Washington at New York City. The battalion served on the Brooklyn front a few days before and during the Battle of Long Island, Aug. 27, 1776 and was in the retreat from New York, Aug. 29 and 30. It was stationed at New York under General Putnam and narrowly escaped capture and they retreated from the city, Sept. 15. They were posted on Harlem (Washington) heights until the Battle of White Plains, Oct. 28, 1776, where the battalion was engaged and suffered some loss. James was mustered out with the company, Dec 25, 1776, and returned to his home.

http://members.dar.org/DAR/DARnet/pi/PI.cfm?Action=Full_Record&Patriot _ID=695426

The children of James and Hannah Sterling

The children were baptized “on his wife’s account.”

0002 Thomas, b. Dec. 6, 1767, bap. Jan. 16, 1775, m. Mehitable Norton, Aug. 23, 1790.

0003 Daniel, b. May 3, 1769, bap. Jan. 16, 1775, m. Mary Bradford, July 25, 1793.

0004 Amy, b. May 19, 1771, bap. Jan. 16, 1775, m. Ephraim Howe.

0005 Isaac, b. June 20, 1773, bap. Jan. 16, 1775, m. 1st, Urania Johnson Nov. 10, 1798. m. 2d, Meliscent Bonney.

0006 Nathaniel, b. Nov. 1, 1775, m. 1st, Prudy Ann Maples. m. 2d, Polly Ann Moss.

0000 A daughter, bap. 1776 ?

0007 Rachel, b. Jan. 15, 1778, bap. Apr. 12, 1778, m. 1st, Jedediah Hewitt, m. 2d, Mr. ___ Stark.

0008 James b. Sep. 10, 1781, bap. Feb. 1781, m. Abigail Maples, Feb. 6, 1803.

0009 Hannah, b. Jan. 7, 1783, m. Thomas Lucas, Jan. 30, 1816.

0010 Anne, b. March 23, 1785. (She d. of fever, Jan. 22, 1806.)

0011 Sarah, b. Dec. 1, 1786. (She d. unm. Apr. 15, 1858.)

0012 Samuel, b. Apr. 1, 1793, m. Mary Newell, Sep. 1, 1831.

0000 A child d. in 1789.

Corporal James Stirling ARW and Hannah May were married on 28 Jun 1767 in Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut By Thormas Russell, United States.11 They were married on 28 Jun 1767 in Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States. Hannah May4–5, daughter of Edward May and Anna ( Anne?) Parris, was born on 3 Nov 1748 in Halifax, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. She was Cornwall First Church about 1775 in Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States.12 She died on 20 May 1834 at the age of 85 in Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States.12

James Stirling and Hannah May had the following child:

6 i. Thomas Stirling, born 6 Dec 1767, Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States; married Mehitable Norton, 23 Aug 1790, Morris, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States; died 26 Nov 1828, Brooklyn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States.

Sixth Generation

6. Thomas Stirling4–5 (James-5, William-4, William-3, Richard-2, William-1) was born on 6 Dec 1767 in Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States.8,11 He was baptized on 16 Jan 1775. He died on 26 Nov 1828 at the age of 60 in Brooklyn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States.13 Thomas was buried after 26 Nov 1868 at Old, Cemtry in Brooklyn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States.13 He was a Wheelwright & Cabinet Maker in Brooklyn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States.13 He was Quaker.13 Thomas was a wheelwright and a cabinet and furniture maker. Thomas Sterling was born on 6 Dec 1767 in Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut. The 6 Dec 1768 date is incorrect, but was recorded in The Sterling Genealogy. I have listed it here, so it will not continue to be repeated. The correct date per the vital statisics for Cornwall is 1767 . He was baptized on 16 Jan 1775 in Cornwall, Litchfield , Connecticut. The children were baptised on “on his wifes account.” He appeared on the census in 1800 in Cornwall, Litchfield , Connecticut.

Thomas “Stirling” was possibly listed twice in the 1800 census, he also appears on line 13 under the city of Goshen. Because the number of children and ages of Thomas and the female in the house are the same, and tie closely to Thomas’s family (James William Sterling his son was an only child.) I’m assuming Thomas was enumerated twice.

His enumeration was 1 male under age 10, one male age 26-45, and one female age 26-45. Whether his house was in Cornwall or Goshen is under some confusion, as the Sterling farm of his father was very close to the border between the two towns. There is a check mark next to the entry in Cornwall on the original record, suggesting some kind of edit was done.

A interesting note is Thomas lived next door to the Bonneys, who went with Thomas to Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania just a few year later.

He was noted in an entry in Cornwall Town Meeting Notes on 17 Dec 1804 in Cornwall, Litchfield , Connecticut.

In the Cornwall Town meeting notes yet another highway project impacted one of the Sterling family members. “And also a highway laid out through Thomas Sterling’s land.” He died on 26 Nov 1828 in Brooklyn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania. He was buried after 26 Nov 1868 in Old, Cemtry , Brooklyn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania. He was a Wheelwright & Cabinet Maker in Brooklyn, Susquehanna Co, Pennsylvania. He was Quaker.

Excerpt from “The Sterling Genealogy” by Albert M. Sterling, pub 1909, pg 902

Thomas Sterling removed from Connecticut to Brooklyn, Susquehanna Co., Penn., in 1812.

At that time the township was known by the name of Hopbottom, deriving this title from the creek along whose banks the early settlers found whild hops growing. The name of the town was changed to Brooklyn in 1825. A settlement was first made within the present limits of Brooklyn by a party of Scots-Irish and Dutch from Philadelphia in 1787. They began to sell their titles to settlers from Connecticut in 1798. The entire section was eventually peopled almost entirely by natives of Connecticut, who at this time supposed that they were moving into a territory over which their old commonwealth had jurisdiction.

Thomas Sterling was a wheelwright and a cabinet and furniture maker. Like his father he was a quaker, one of few in locality. He and his wife are buried in the old cemetery in Brooklyn. The inscription on the stone above their graves reads: “Thomas Sterling died Nov. 26 , 18 28 Aged 61 years also Mehetabel his wife Died Sept. 18, 1827, Aged 60 years.”

Thomas Stirling and Mehitable Norton were married on 23 Aug 1790 in Morris, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States. Mehitable Norton4–5, daughter of Daniel Norton and Elizabeth Howe, was born on 1 Jun 1768. She died on 18 Sep 1827 at the age of 59 in Brooklyn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States. She was buried in Brooklyn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States.

Thomas Stirling and Mehitable Norton had the following child:

7 i. James William Sterling, born Mar 1791, Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States; married Elizabeth Tewksbury, Jan 1813; died 13 Jun 1864, Brooklyn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States.

Seventh Generation

7. James William Sterling4–5 (Thomas-6, James-5, William-4, William-3, Richard-2, William-1) was born in Mar 1791 in Cornwall, Litchfield, Connecticut, United States.14 He died on 13 Jun 1864 at the age of 73 in Brooklyn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States.15–16 He was buried in Old Brooklyn Cmtry, Brooklyn, Susquehanna.17 James was Quaker.17

James, commonly called by his second name William, migrated to Brooklyn, Susquehanna County , Pennslyvania, in the spring of 1811, when in his 21st year. He made the journey on foot , with a knapsack on his back. He worked that summer chopping and clearing the trees from the land on which he later built his home.

In the fall he returned to Connecticut and came back in the following spring with his father and mother. His father bought the land and deeded it to James in 1819. James was a farmer , and like his father and grandfather was a Quaker.

Source: The Sterling Genealogy, Albert M. Sterling, Page 908.

James Wm. Sterling came from Fairfield, Ct. in the spring of 1811, when he was 20 years old . He journey was made on foot with his knapsack on his back. He worked that summer chopping and clearing on the place, boarding at Mr. Chapman’s. The story is still told that David M organ who came the year before, and Charles Perigo who came two years before, were each chopping at the same time on their respective places, one to the north and the other over the hill to the east, but both were still boarding at Mr. Chapmans. It is related that Capt . Morgan and Mr. Perigo were well enough suited with ordinary pioneer fare, and were each to pay one day’s work in each week for their board, but Mr. S. thought he must have some extras and had to pay more. He returned to Connecticut in the fall and came back with his father and mother the following spring. He married Betsey (or Elizabeth) Tewksbury then living on the next place south. Mr. S. was of Quaker proclivities, and a friend of Enoch Waker of Dimock.

Source: A History of Brooklyn, by E.A. Weston Pages 149-150.

JAMES WILLIAM Sterling (son of Thomas, grandson of James), b. in Cornwall, Conn., in March , 1 791; m. in Jan., 1813, Betsey Tewksbury, b. Jan. 4, 1795, dau. of Jacob Tewksbury (who came from Vermont) by his second wife, Mary Reed.

James, commonly called by his second name William, migrated to Brooklyn, Susquehanna Co., Penn., in the spring of 1811, when in his twenty-first year. He made the journey on foot, wi t h a knapsack on his back. He worked that summer chopping and clearing the trees from the la n d on which he later built his home. In the fall he returned to Connecticut and came back in the following spring with his father and mother. The father bought the land and deeded i t to J ames in 1819. James was a farmer, and like his father and grandfather was a Quaker. He d. Jun e 13, 1864. Betsey (or Elizabeth) Sterling d. June 3, 1877. They are buried in the o ld cemetery, in Brooklyn.

James William Sterling and Elizabeth Tewksbury were married in Jan 1813.18 Elizabeth Tewksbury4–5, daughter of Jacob Tewksbury and Mary “Polly” Reed, was born on 4 Jan 1795 in Vermont.17 She died on 3 Jun 1877 at the age of 82 in Brooklyn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States. She was buried after 3 Jun 1877 in Old Brooklyn Cemetery, Brooklyn, Susquehanna.17

James William Sterling and Elizabeth Tewksbury had the following child:

8 i. Rev Albert George Sterling, born 16 Dec 1815, Brooklyn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States; married Clarissa Gay, 31 Oct 1836; died 7 Nov 1890, Auburn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States.

Eighth Generation

8. Rev Albert George Sterling4–5 (James William-7, Thomas-6, James-5, William-4, William-3, Richard-2, William-1) was born on 16 Dec 1815 in Brooklyn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States.19 About 1860 he was a Farmer in Auburn Township, Suquehannah, Pennsylvania, United States.19 He died on 7 Nov 1890 at the age of 74 in Auburn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States.19 After his marriage, Albert and his wife removed to Auburn, a district then unsettled and unimproved, where he built a log house, later replaced by a more substantial structure. He was a farmer.

Rev Albert George Sterling and Clarissa Gay were married on 31 Oct 1836.19 Clarissa Gay4–5,20, daughter of George Gay and Alphia Blackmar, was born on 6 Aug 1811 in Herkimer County, New York, United States.19–20 She lived in Auburn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States in 1860.20 She died on 10 Jan 1896 at the age of 84 in West Auburn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States.

Albert and his wife removed to auburn township, Susquehannah Co., Penn., a district then unsettled and unimproved, where he built a log house, later replaced by a more substantial structure. He was a farmer. He d. Nov. 7, 1890. Clarissa d. Jan. 20, 1896, at West Auburn.

BLACKMORE, GAY, HUGHES, STEBBINS, Sterling posted by Del Hardy on Friday, April 17, 1998

George and Alphia BLACKMORE GAY lived in Braintrim Luzerne and Wyoming Counties PA between 1812 and 1840. I have a copy of a hand written note made by a great-granddaughter of this couple Marjorie Lucy GAY HUGHES. She lists the children of this union as Ansel 1809 Clarisa (Sterling) 1811 Barther C. 1813 Ahira 1816 Daniel 1818 Moses 1820 Mary (STEBBINS)1821 Candance 1824 Amelia and Arelia 1827. I understand that the will of George GAY page 73 Wilkes Barre PA signed 3 Jul 1841 includes a son named Samuel and that there is no mention of a son named Daniel. I do not have a copy of this will. I would appreciate any information that would help me resolve this conflicting information. Several of the children of this family married and settled in the Luzerne Susquehanna Wyoming counties area.

Clarissa had a brother named Ahira.

Albert George Sterling and Clarissa Gay had the following child:

9 i. George Elmer Sterling, born 24 Feb 1845, Auburn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States; died 17 Jun 1927, East Maine, Town of Maine, Broome County, New York, United States.

Ninth Generation

9. George Elmer Sterling5,8,21 (Albert George-8, James William-7, Thomas-6, James-5, William-4, William-3, Richard-2, William-1) was born on 24 Feb 1845 in Auburn, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States.19,22 In 1890 he was a Tanner living at 56 Conklin Ave, in Binghamton, New York, United States.23 He was buried in Jun 1927 in East Maine Cemetery, Town of Maine, Broome County, New York, United States.21,24 George died on 17 Jun 1927 at the age of 82 in East Maine, Town of Maine, Broome County, New York, United States.21,24 Farmer he was a Farmer in Plat of Maine Lot #83 100 Acres Nanticoke Township, Town of Maine, Broome County, New York, United States. He lived in East Main, New York, United States before 1900 to 1927.19 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE:A.K.A.] Resided at: circa 1909 in East Main, New York

In the Binghamton New York Directories for 1888 to 1890 …

Mrs. Bertha E. Sterling dressmaker 56 Conklin avenue do Binghamton NY 1890
George E. Sterling tanner 56 Conklin avenue Binghamton NY 1890
Manley J. Sterling laborer boards 56 Conklin avenue Binghamton NY 1890

1920 Census – George and Bertha are living with grandson Floyd Dunning on Gulf Road

Bertha Lavinia Magee4–5, daughter of William Magee and Sarah Elizabeth Lung, was born on 15 Jun 1847 in Montrose, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States.25 In 1890 she was a Dressmaker living at 56 Conklin Ave. in Binghamton, Broome County, New York, United States.23 She died on 13 Aug 1931 at the age of 84 in Maine, Broome County, New York, United States. Bertha was buried in Aug 1931 in East Maine Cemetery, Town of Maine, Broome County, New York, United States.

 

George Elmer Sterling and Bertha Lavinia Magee had the following child:

10 i. Warren Augustus Sterling, born 24 Oct 1876, Auburn Township, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States; married Nellie L. Eggleston, abt 1896; died 3 Dec 1937, Lancaster, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States.

Tenth Generation

10. Warren Augustus Sterling5,26–27 (George Elmer-9, Albert George-8, James William-7, Thomas-6, James-5, William-4, William-3, Richard-2, William-1) was born on 24 Oct 1876 in Auburn Township, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States.26–27 On 11 Sep 1918 he was a Motorman for Conestoga Traction Company in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, United States. Source: 1918 US Draft Registration

Conestoga Traction, later Conestoga Transportation Company, was a classic American regional interurban trolley that operated seven routes 1899 to 1946 radiating spoke-like from Lancaster, Pennsylvania to numerous neighboring farm villages and towns. It ran side-of-road trolleys through Amish farm country to Coatesville, Strasburg/Quarryville, Pequea, Columbia/Marietta, Elizabethtown, Manheim/Lititz, and Ephrata/Adamstown/Terre Hill. He lived in Manheim, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States in 1930.27 Warren died on 3 Dec 1937 at the age of 61 in Lancaster, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States.26 He was buried on 6 Dec 1937 in Riverview Cemetery On South Duke Saint In Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States. Plant Foreman he was an Armstrong Linoleum Plant in Lancaster, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States.26 Warren fell into the linoleum printing press and his upper torso was crushed. Warren served in the military approx bet 1896 and 1898 in Spanish American War. Died in an industrial accident 1937 Armstrong Linoleum Co., Lancaster, PA. Fell into linoleum making machine and was crushed.

Warren Augustus Sterling and Nellie L. Eggleston were married about 1896. Nellie L. Eggleston5,28–29, daughter of William Eggleston and Mary Jane Cooper, was born in 1875 in Probably Milford, Otsego County, New York, United States.30 1880 Fed Census gives her age as 5 years old She was born in 1875 in Probably Milford, Otsego County, New York, United States.28–29 She lived in Middlefield, Otsego, New York, United States in 1880.28 Nellie lived in Milford, Otsego, New York, United States in 1910.29 She died after 1910 at the age of 35.30 She was still alive in 1910 Fed Census living with parents William & Mary Jane Eggleston on Brook St in Milford, Otsego Co, New York She died Living with parents after 1910 at the age of 35 in Milford, Otsego County, New York, United States. Nellie was buried in Milford Cemetery (Possible – No Death Date On Headstone), Milford, Otsego County, New York, United States. She was buried in Milford Cemetery, Milford, Otsego County, New York, United States. Name: Nellie L from 1880 census – age then given as 5 years old

Warren Augustus Sterling and Nellie L. Eggleston had the following child:

11 i. William Elmer Sterling I, born 25 May 1901, New York, United States; married Letha Aurilla Kelley, 18 Oct 1919, Binghamton, Broome, New York, United States; died 17 Aug 1985, Binghamton, Broome, New York, United States.

Eleventh Generation

11. William Elmer Sterling I5,31 (Warren Augustus-10, George Elmer-9, Albert George-8, James William-7, Thomas-6, James-5, William-4, William-3, Richard-2, William-1) was born on 25 May 1901 in New York, United States.31 He was buried in Aug 1985 at Cremated and buried atop Leatha Aurilla Kelley Sterling his wife in Chenango Valley Cemetery, Broome, New York, United States. He died on 17 Aug 1985 at the age of 84 in Binghamton, Broome, New York, United States.31 [NEED TO DEFINE SENTENCE:Grave] Living at 101 Court St in 1920 US census

William Elmer Sterling I and Letha Aurilla Kelley were married on 18 Oct 1919 at Frist Presbytartian Church 6 Floral Ave, Binghamton, Broome, NY in Binghamton, Broome, New York, United States. Letha Aurilla Kelley5, daughter of Joseph Edward Kelley and Mary Mandana Palmer, was born on 27 Sep 1905 in Wyalusing, Bradford, Pennsylvania, United States.31 She was buried in Jun 1957 in Chenango Vally Cemetery, Broome County, New York, United States. Burial plot purchased by Mary E Hinds-Sterling She died on 19 Jun 1957 at the age of 51 in Binghamton, Broome Ny, United States.25

William Elmer Sterling and Letha Aurilla Kelley had the following child:

12 i. William Elmer Sterling II, born 29 Feb 1924, Binghamton, Broome County, New York, United States; married Mary Elizabeth Hinds, 14 Mar 1943, Halstead, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, United States; died 13 Apr 1996, Binghamton, Broome County, New York, United States.